During the Panathenaic festival, celebrants would carry a new robe to the ancient wooden cult statue of Athena, housed in the Erechtheion. The temple was then more accurately reconstructed. Throughout the centuries, the ...read more, Few monuments in the world are more recognizable than the Parthenon. This Doric limestone building, from which many relics survive, is referred to as the Hekatompedon (Greek for "hundred–footed"), Ur-Parthenon (German for "original Parthenon" or "primitive Parthenon"), H–Architecture or Bluebeard temple, after the pedimental three-bodied man-serpent sculpture, whose beards were painted dark blue.

Hundreds of artisans, metalworkers, craftspeople, painters, woodcarvers, and literally thousands of unskilled labourers worked on the Acropolis. In 480 B.C., the Persians attacked again and burned, leveled and looted the Old Parthenon and almost every other structure at the Acropolis. Farther east lay the Odeum of Pericles, and to the west are traces (420 bce) of the precinct of Asclepius, the god of healing, which took the form of a hospital portico for patients and temples decorated with votive reliefs. It has withstood bombardment, massive earthquakes and vandalism yet still stands as a reminder of the rich history of Greece. Details of the Acropolis, Athens, Greece. The duc de Choiseul, formerly French ambassador in Constantinople, picked up a piece of the frieze and two metopes. A new bulwark named after Odysseas Androutsos was built by the Greeks between 1822 and 1825 to protect the recently rediscovered Klepsydra spring which became the sole fresh water supply of the fortress.

There were two lesser approaches up the hill on its north side, consisting of steep, narrow flights of steps cut in the rock. Acropolis, Athens: (Cycle 1) Section II Summary. to 480. [31] Eumenes was also responsible for constructing a stoa on the South slope, not unlike that of Attalos in the Agora below. Though the word is Greek in origin, it has come to designate any such structure built on a high elevation anywhere in the world. During the 7th and the 6th centuries BC, the site was controlled by Kylon during the failed Kylonian revolt,[10] and twice by Peisistratos; each of these were attempts directed at seizing political power by coups d'état. The limestone phase of the building is referred to as Pre-Parthenon I and the marble phase as Pre-Parthenon II. [6] The wall consisted of two parapets built with large stone blocks and cemented with an earth mortar called emplekton (Greek: ἔμπλεκτον). Disclaimer | This website uses cookies to personalise content, provide social media features and analyse traffic. [46], Every four years, the Athenians had a festival called the Great Panathenaea that rivaled the Olympic Games in popularity. (2010). The original sculptures are conserved in the Acropolis Museum. [5] Soon after the palace was constructed, a Cyclopean massive circuit wall was built, 760 meters long, up to 10 meters high, and ranging from 3.5 to 6 meters thick. Just in front of it and to the left is the 27-foot-high pedestal for the thank offering to Agrippa, the victor of the Battle of Actium, who interceded for Athens, which had supported the loser, Mark Antony. A journey Throughout history, Ephesus survived multiple attacks and changed ...read more, In the year 507 B.C., the Athenian leader Cleisthenes introduced a system of political reforms that he called demokratia, or “rule by the people” (from demos, “the people,” and kratos, or “power”). Production costs were met by private sponsors who, when their choruses won the prize tripod, displayed it in an elaborate memorial in the Street of Tripods to the east of the theatre. Welcome to AcropolisofAthens.gr! While there is evidence that the hill was inhabited as far back as the fourth millennium BC, it was Pericles (c. 495–429 BC) in the fifth century BC who coordinated the construction of the site's most important present remains including the Parthenon, the Propylaea, the Erechtheion and the Temple of Athena Nike. https://www.ancient.eu/Acropolis/. Metro: Monastiraki, lines 1 and 3; Akropoli, line 2. The Acropolis, and the Parthenon in particular, is the most characteristic monument of the ancient Greek civilisation. The columns, of diminishing thickness toward the centre of the colonnade, with diminishing space between them, lean toward the centre, too; all these differences are virtually invisible to the beholder. Pedley writes: The Parthenon is unusual for its mass of Doric refinements…Though these modifications to the horizontal and vertical are miniscule, there are nevertheless no true verticals or horizontals in the building, and hence no right angles. It’s best known for its porch supported by six Caryatid maiden statues. Uniquely, capturing the gravity of the Athenian Acropolis as a symbol, UNESCO recognises that “[…] the Acropolis, the site of four of the greatest masterpieces of classical Greek art – the Parthenon, the Propylaea, the Erechtheum and the Temple of Athena Nike – can be seen as symbolizing the idea of world heritage” (UNESCO, 2006). Our latest articles delivered to your inbox, once a week: Numerous educational institutions recommend us, including Oxford University and Michigan State University and University of Missouri. The Acropolis. [29], During the Hellenistic and Roman periods, many of the existing buildings in the area of the Acropolis were repaired, due to damage from age, and occasionally, war. [28] Other monuments that have left almost nothing visible to the present day are the Chalkotheke, the Pandroseion, Pandion's sanctuary, Athena's altar, Zeus Polieus's sanctuary and, from Roman times, the circular temple of Augustus and Rome. The building was burned and looted, along with the Ancient Temple and practically everything else on the rock.

Around 490 B.C., the Athenians started building a majestic marble temple known as the Old Parthenon. [21] These colonnades were almost finished during 432 BC and had two wings, the northern one decorated with paintings by Polygnotus. At the turn of the twentieth century, restorations began.