When the sweatin' troop-train lay Din! An' 'e didn't seem to know the use o' fear. "Gunga Din", lines 82-84 View the full poem on Wikisource. Perhaps you need to reread the last few lines. You 'eathen, where the mischief 'ave you been? When the cartridges ran out,       You could 'ear the front-files shout:          "Hi! Then we wopped 'im 'cause 'e couldn't serve us all. You are a fool Lynch. You will do your work on water, He was "Din! Givin' drink to pore damned souls, In the final three lines, the soldier regrets the abuse that he dealt to Din and admits that Din is the better man. Din! 'E carried me away The poem is much remembered for its final line: "You're a better man than I am, Gunga Din". The movie was remade in 1961 as Sergeants 3, starring the Rat Pack. You limping lump o' brick-dust, Gunga Din! Din! My first exposure to Gunga Din was an old Mr. McGoo cartoon as a kid. When the sweatin' troop-train lay   In a sidin' through the day,      Where the 'eat would make your bloomin' eyebrows crawl,   We shouted "Harry By!" After much spirited derring-do, all four of the main characters are captured by the Thuggees and forced to watch as an ambush is prepared for their regiment. Originally, Grant and Fairbanks were assigned each other's role, Grant the one who was leaving the army to marry Joan Fontaine, Fairbanks the happy-go-lucky treasure hunter. A much-maligned poem - invariably by those who have either never read it or have failed to understand it! In a sidin' through the day,        25 'E put me safe inside,   An' just before 'e died:   "I 'ope you liked your drink," sez Gunga Din. Copyright © 2008 - 2020 . The film premiered in Los Angeles on January 24, 1939. Filming began on June 24, 1938 and was completed on October 19, 1938. He was "Din! An' 'e's kickin' all around: The uniform 'e wore All information has been reproduced here for educational and informational purposes to benefit site visitors, and is provided at no charge... Recite this poem (upload your own video or voice file). Archive of Classic Poems. Was our good old grinnin', gruntin' Gunga Din. Din! Din! You’re a better man than I am, Gunga Din. And I don't find it difficult to understand at all. 'E would dot an' carry one      Till the longest day was done,   An' 'e didn't seem to know the use o' fear. Din!" An’ I’ll get a swig in hell from Gunga Din! When I dropped be'ind the fight Weekned? Initially, the master of the poor man abuses him. slippery hitherao! 'E's chawin' up the ground, He's talking about English soldiers fighting in provincial India - of all the black-faced crew refers to the interred Indian soldiers. 'E lifted up my 'ead,   An' 'e plugged me where I bled,   An' 'e guv me 'arf-a-pint o' water—green;      It was crawlin' an' it stunk,   But of all the drinks I've drunk,   I'm gratefullest to one from Gunga Din. Hi! 30 Din! It was "Din! Hi! For a twisty piece o' rag written in an age where class distinction was rife, not only in occupied territories. I will bet you were never in service and for sure never in country. An' rather less than 'arf o' that be'ind, Was our good old grinnin', gruntin' Gunga Din. The English singer Peter Bellamy included a setting of the poem on his record of Barrack Room Ballads. I remember this poem from reading it in school and I never forgot it. Hi! Din! Find and share the perfect poems. You're a better man than I am, Gunga Din! Kipling is undoubtedly gifted by God. 'Ere's a beggar with a bullet through 'is spleen;       65 [Bring water swiftly.] "Gunga Din" is an 1890 poem by Rudyard Kipling set in British India. Now in Injia's sunny clime, Where I used to spend my time A-servin' of 'Er Majesty the Queen, Of all them blackfaced crew The …     Or I'll marrow you this minute, Till the longest day was done; Water, get it! Or I'll ~marrow~ you this minute [Hit you.] An' I'll get a swig in hell from Gunga Din! An' a bullet come an' drilled the beggar clean. The movie includes a sequence at the end in which a fictionalised Rudyard Kipling, played by Reginald Sheffield, hears of the events and is inspired to write his poem (the scene in which the poem is first read out carefully quotes only those parts of the poem that tally with the events of the movie).     You could 'ear the front-files shout:      50 The uniform 'e wore   Was nothin' much before,   An' rather less than 'arf o' that be'ind,      For a twisty piece o' rag   An' a goatskin water-bag   Was all the field-equipment 'e could find. For other uses, see, "Philip French's DVD club: No 79: Gunga Din", https://www.allmusic.com/album/the-last-blast-of-the-blasted-bugler-mw0001002737, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DSpv2tdMBvE, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Gunga_Din&oldid=983109858, Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License. Yes, Din! You could hear the front-files shout, To where a dooli lay, When the sweatin' troop-train lay [7]. It was crawlin' an' it stunk, Like several other Kipling poems, it celebrates the virtues of a non-European while portraying (and implicitly challenging) an infantryman's view of such people as being of a "lower order". You put some juldee in it,       Or I'll marrow you this minute,       If you don't fill up my helmet, Gunga Din!". 'E lifted up my 'ead, Though I've belted you and flayed you, By the livin' Gawd that made you, You're a better man than I am, Gunga Din! Was our regimental bhisti, Gunga Din. Din! Some of the incidental scenes that flesh out the story were filmed while the hundreds of extras were in the background being marshalled for larger takes. An' you'll lick the bloomin' boots of 'im that's got it. 70     'E's chawin' up the ground an' 'e's kickin' all around: Was nothin' much before, bhisti - water-carrier hitherao - come here panee lao - bring water Harry By - O Brother juldee - quickly marrow - hit . An' I'll get a swig in hell from Gunga Din! You may talk o' gin an' beer   When you're quartered safe out 'ere,   An' you're sent to penny-fights an' Aldershot it;   But if it comes to slaughter   You will do your work on water,            An' you'll lick the bloomin' boots of 'im that's got it. The poem was published as part of a set of martial poems called the Barrack-Room Ballads. Was our good old grinnin’, gruntin’ Gunga Din. Yes, Din! An' the man that spied me first ‘If you don’t fill up my helmet, Gunga Din!’. "Hi! ammunition-mules an' Gunga Din!" You may talk o' gin and beerWhen you're quartered safe out 'ere,An' you're sent to penny-fights an' Aldershot it;But when it comes to slaughterYou will do your work on water,An' you'll lick the bloomin' boots of 'im that's got it.Now in Injia's sunny clime,Where I used to spend my timeA-servin' of 'Er Majesty the Queen,Of all them blackfaced crewThe finest man I knewWas our regimental bhisti, Gunga Din. search. The uniform 'e wore Was nothin' much before, An' rather less than 'arf o' that be'ind, For a piece o' twisty rag An' a goatskin water-bag Was all the field-equipment 'e could find.         By the livin' Gawd that made you, Put into Rudyard Kipling's overall racist perspectives and views on white people's superiority, your interpretation rings a bit hollow. I'm gratefullest to one from Gunga Din. Gunga Din" is an 1890 poem by Rudyard Kipling set in British India. I haven't read this poem in over 50 years, Amazing piece of pathos.