COAL MINING RISK ASSESSMENT FOR PROPOSED REDEVELOPMENT OF TRAINING FACILITIES, STOCKBRIDGE DRIVE, PADIHAM, BURNLEY, LANCASHIRE, BB12 8UA, JANUARY 2015 . Occupying a syncline, it stretches from Blackburn pa Whitebirk Pit was abandoned on the 12th June, 1895, although only a small amount of top mines were worked. The local school of art created pages of vellum with the names of the fallen inscribed. [11] In the 1840s some old small pits such as Cleggs Pit and Habergham closed and larger collieries were sunk at Bank House Colliery, Whittlefield Colliery and the old Fulledge Colliery was redeveloped and linked by a tramway to canal. 1. The coal seam was about 24" and the upper mountain seam was at a depth of 240 feet. At this point, it was within the manor of Ightenhill, one of five that made up the Honor of Clitheroe, then a far more significant settlement, and consisted of no more than 50 families. The Over Darwen Industrial Co-operative Society Ltd. transferred the lease of Whitebirk Colliery to William Henry Shaw & Co. in 1890. Ann was the name of John Bailey's wife and their farm was called Coal Pits Farm. 52 on the north side below. [10], The arrival of the Leeds and Liverpool Canal was a catalyst for industrialisation as was the coming of the Lancashire and Yorkshire Railway line through Burnley to Colne in 1848. Its coal seams were formed from the vegetation of tropical swampy forests in the Carboniferous period over 300 million years ago. Coal had been dug out of the earth as early as the 13th century in the Burnley Area. [3] Named faults include the Deerplay Fault in the middle of the district which is associated with a line to west where the Lower Mountain and Upper Foot mines combine to form the Union mine. The coal industry grew in the 16th and 17th centuries, developing from manorial tenants who dug coal for their own use into fixed term leases in return for rent. [12], Several collieries were nationalised under the Coal Industry Nationalisation Act 1946 on vesting day, 1 January 1947. By 1800, more than a dozen pits had been sunk in central Burnley. Former miner Jack Nadin said: "There must be hundreds of former miners and families out there willing to help this worthy cause. Retrieved 6 September 2007. Coal was exploited in the 13th century at Trawden near Colne where receipts are mentioned in a rent roll from 1295. Within the coalfield, the dip in the strata varies from shallow to the south and west but steeper where there are faults. Cliviger is a civil parish in the Borough of Burnley, in Lancashire, England. Oswaldtwistle is contiguous with Accrington and Church. (This could be the Cob Wall Bridge Pit mentioned in a survey in 1874 by Edward Hull). [14] Hill Top Colliery, a small drift mine near Bacup, was still producing small amounts of coal in 2010. This was another significant boost to the local economy and, by 1851, the town's population had reached almost 21,000.The Cotton Famine of 1861–1865, caused by the American Civil War, was again disastrous for the town. His home was where the Beechwood club is today. Mining at Hoddlesden ended in 1938 when the seams were exhausted. In 1888 the Livesey Fire Clay Works were mining fire clay out from the colliery, the fire clay seam was about 165 feet deep. [14] Coal was opencast at Helm, Royal Zone, Gawthorpe Hall and Tipping Hill. Hill Top Colliery, a privately owned drift mine near Bacup, was still producing small amounts of coal in 2010. Sunk in the late 1860s, it was linked to the Lancashire and Yorkshire Railway's Burnley to Todmorden line which became known as the Copy Pit route and, by tramway, to the Leeds and Liverpool Canal. Although the whole parish lies within the Borough of Burnley it is actually split between three postal towns, with a few farms lying in either the Todmorden or Bacup postal areas. Bethorn Drift was officially abandoned in 1901. Coal was exploited in the 13th century at Trawden near Colne where receipts are mentioned in a rent roll from 1295. There was an old early coal mine just off Shorrock Lane, Blackburn that was known as 'Shorrocks'. The Union mine is contaminated with in-seam concretions known locally as coal balls or bobbers, spherical concretions, composed of limestone measuring from 0.1 to 1.0 metre in diameter that posed hazards for mining. Retrieved 6 September 2007. The Burnley Coalfield which surrounds Burnley, Nelson, Blackburn and Accrington is the most northerly portion of the Lancashire Coalfield. [1] Occupying a syncline bounded by the Pendle monocline to the north, the coalfield stretches from Blackburn, eastwards past Colne to the Pennine anticline on the border with Yorkshire. [13] After the 1950s much of the area was opencasted. This mine was abandoned in 1859. Coal was mined all around Burnley, mostly from shafts. Site: little remains of the drift entry which was sited on the bank below Cote Farm. [2], The coalfield's seams are the Westphalian Coal Measures of the Carboniferous period, laid down from the vegetation of tropical swampy forests more than 300 million years ago but here, only the Lower Coal Measures remain. Time to make some memories! Data returned from the Piano 'meterActive/meterExpired' callback event. [12], Several collieries were nationalised under the Coal Industry Nationalisation Act 1946 on vesting day, 1 January 1947. Prosperous residents built larger houses, including Gawthorpe Hall in Padiham and Towneley Hall. North West Division on the boundary of the County Borough of Burnley. [9] The first coals were extracted at the outcrops before shaft and adit mining were adopted. The Rossendale anticline, an area of Millstone Grit, separates it from the larger southern part of the coalfield. Local place names Padiham and Habergham show the influence of the Angles, suggesting that some had settled in the area by the early 7th century; some time later the land became part of the hundred of Blackburnshire.There is no definitive record of a settlement until after the Norman conquest of England. ), and is named after its largest town, Burnley. A tramway was constructed in 1861 to link the pit to Roman Road (Old Sett End), and about 1872 the course was altered to a new staithe (New Sett End) sited to the south. In 1858 the following notice appeared in a local newspaper: The lessee's interest of & in the Livesey Hall Colliery, together with the steam engine, pumps, headgear, & the whole of the working plant. [5] The most important were the Lower/Union and Upper Mountain, Dandy, King and Arley mines. [2], The coalfield's seams are the Westphalian Coal Measures of the Carboniferous period, laid down from the vegetation of tropical swampy forests more than 300 million years ago but here, only the Lower Coal Measures remain. 1997 The Coal Mines of East-Lancashire (British Mining No.58, NMRS) Williamson, … The shafts were about 50 feet deep and around 4 feet wide. A. [12], Several collieries were nationalised under the Coal Industry Nationalisation Act 1946 on vesting day, 1 January 1947. The area of working extended south-east of the pit heads under Hoddlesden Moss. To the rear of Holker House is a tree covered mound indicating the position of the main winding shaft. Occupying a syncline, it stretches from Blackburn past Colne to the Yorkshire border where its eastern flank is the Pennine anticline. Its coal seams were formed from the vegetation of tropical swampy forests in the Carboniferous period more than 300 million years ago. [7] [8] Coal extracted from the Arley, Upper and Lower Mountain mines was used to produce high grade metallurgical coke which was in high demand for industry, whereas coal from the Union/Upper Foot mines had a high sulphur content making it unsuitable for making coke. Modern-day Back Lane, Sump Hall Lane and Noggarth Road broadly follow the route of a classic ridgeway running east–west to the north of the town, suggesting that the area was populated during pre-history and probably controlled by the Brigantes.Limited coin finds indicate a Roman presence, but no evidence of a settlement has been found in the town. On the corner of the shippon was the following inscription "i b 1720". This site is to the rear of Woodlands Housing Estate at Cherry Tree, one of the shafts is capped. The 1980s and 1990s saw massive expansion of Ightenhill and Whittlefield. Dozens of new mills were constructed, along with many foundries and ironworks that supplied the cotton mills and coal mines with machinery and cast and wrought iron for construction. The site of this colliery is to the right of the 'Red Lion' pub at Whitebirk. (Date 31st Dec, 1858. ) An unexpected benefit of the conflict for the residents of Burnley occurred in 1940. the Leeds canal will come close by the estate or through a part thereof. By 1910, there were approximately 99,000 power looms in the town, and it reached its peak population of over 100,000 in 1911. [11] In the 1840s some old small pits such as Cleggs Pit and Habergham closed and larger collieries were sunk at Bank House Colliery, Whittlefield Colliery and the old Fulledge Colliery was redeveloped and linked by a tramway to canal. Nadin, J. The top mine was abandoned due to an influx of water. In a letter to the Petre Family from Arthur Shaw he informed them that William Henry Shaw had died on Friday, 26th May, 1893. They quarried for the fire clay that lies beneath the coal seam to a depth of 50 feet. When the old Blackburn Market House was demolished this was also tipped in here. Wier, Manager, and Mr. R. … [13] After the 1950s much of the area was opencasted. [7][8] Coal extracted from the Arley, Upper and Lower Mountain mines was used to produce high grade metallurgical coke which was in high demand for industry, whereas coal from the Union/Upper Foot mines had a high sulphur content making it unsuitable for making coke.[5]. Blackburn Corporation Hospital was built on land to the side of Coal Pits Farm and was built in 1894. On the corner of the shippon was the following inscription "i … There are now houses built on the site of the colliery which was named after the owner of the land, Mr. James Fisher Armistead.