He loves assuming the voice of an eccentric narrator. Confessions of Felix Krull is Thomas Mann's attempt at the picaresque, and Krull is something of a mix between Don Quixote and Ignatius J. Reilly from A Confederacy of Dunces. The writing is sublime, descriptive, and inspiring. Supposedly an unfinished fragment, the novel ends on a high note, and really doesn't need any further elaboration. He's still Thomas Mann. Complete summary of Thomas Mann's Confessions of Felix Krull, Confidence Man. I recently reread Confessions of Felix Krull, Confidence Man (The Early Years), Thomas Mann's last novel and a comic masterpiece. My review is the exact opposite, which suggests that this is just about taste. Also includes sites with a short overview, synopsis, book report, or summary of Thomas Mann’s Confessions of Felix Krull. It was as if it were written by a completely different Mann. It is an amazing book for all ages. One of the jewels of the book is Krull's "letter home" to the woman who is supposed to be his mother after he switched identities with a real aristocrat who wanted to continue slumming in Paris with a show girl. It's a few days that I finished the novel, and with the benefit of distance that comes with hindsight I think I have to say that I would have wanted more. Clearly Thomas Mann has much more of a grasp on it than me. The first half, for me, was a little too cutesy with the symbolism, as Krull discovers how much he enjoys acting, impersonating, and being praised for his beauty. Browse books: Recent| popular| #| a| b| c| d| e| f| g| h| i| j| k| l| m| n| o| p| q| r| s| t| u| v| w| x| y| z|. If there is a Confessions of Felix Krull SparkNotes, Shmoop guide, or Cliff Notes, you can find a link to each study guide below. Parts of the novel are laugh-out-loud funny--not a gut reaction I've ever had to a Mann novel. I know Mann is very much a respected guy, I think I've chosen the wrong book of his to read first.

Readers of picaresque fiction must be constantly aware that the presentation is subjective, the perception superficial and the point of view (generally first person) dominated by illusion, disguise, and literal and figurative masks. There were some interesting parts but the narrator was so full of himself that the language just annoyed me most of the time. When you read this strange, delightful, exciting novel you'll know what he meant. The picaro is forced to survive by whatever means he finds available, most commonly chicanery and illusion. There's something about Mann and his narrative style...it's charming. He's still Thomas Mann. I had a sudden thought about this book which I had read some time ago which was how curious it was that a writer's last work was focused on a confidence trickster and his trickery when what is writing but a confidence trick created with the collusion of the reader. We’d love your help. In the three main characteristics that I use to judge a novel, story/plot, writing, and characters, it exceeds profusely.

You'll be surprised to learn that Felix has a family, there is a crisis, h. A friend's review of this is: great first half, dull second half. The fact that her real son could not possibly have written it just doesn't matter to her. Just a moment while we sign you in to your Goodreads account. Following Krull along the shady paths his nature has destined him to take, the reader moves through a world peopled by bizarre characters from the lowest to the highest reaches of European society. GoodReads community and editorial reviews can be helpful for getting a wide range of opinions on various aspects of the book. The Confessions of Felix Krull, Confidence Man, novel by Thomas Mann, originally published in German as Die Bekenntnisse des Hochstaplers Felix Krull in 1954; the first few chapters were published in 1922 as a short story. March 31st 1992 The translation by Denver Lindley is nothing short of superb. Sites like SparkNotes with a Confessions of Felix Krull study guide or cliff notes. The story is as imaginative as one could hope for and it's as funny as any book I have read. Felix Krull takes place in 1895, a time when no one (well, no one but people like Bertha von Suttner), had any inkling of the imminent tragedies of the 20th century. Mann based the novel on an expanded version of a story he had written in 1911 and he managed to finish, and publish part one of the Confessions of Felix Krull, but due to his death in 1955 the saga of the morally flexible and irresistible conman, Felix, remained unf. Magic Mountain is overshadowed by the inevitable coming of World War I, Doktor Faustus directly confronts the evils of World War II. In writing Felix Krull, I wonder if Thomas Mann was trying to prove that after all his heavy-duty works he could still turn out a romantic comedy, although not the ordinary kind. Our summaries and analyses are written by experts, and your questions are answered by real teachers. The picaresque approach, in which social criticism is made more palatable by a liberal application of humor, reveals the discrepancy between what people are and what they think they are. Kirkus Reviews tend to be brief, only two or three paragraphs long. Please see the supplementary resources provided below for other helpful content related to this book. Aristocrats, the wealthy, mothers and even academics get skewered.

All Right Reserved. The first part of the book, I have to be honest, is boring...I almost gave up on it. Mann has a lot of fun with aristocratic pretensions as Krull easily assumes the identity of an aristocrat, gets an audience with the king of Portugal and is awarded a medal, so he can dress properly decorated for formal occasions. He is the perpetual outsider gazing into the light but forever condemned to the dark side of reality; he epitomizes the individual who is a member of society but is alienated from and isolated by it. The refined reader can ignore the implications of this or he can fill in the part of the story that occurs off stage. I orginally read this in college while doing a course on Hesse and Mann. It's silly to blame Felix Krull for talking like a pompous douche, that's kind of the main purpose of the novel. Mann himself came across, especially to Americans, as a professorial type, even though he actually failed repeatedly in school, and never went to college. Felix sculpts himself and those around him to support his role-playing. It is told in Thomas Mann's impeccable and elegant prose although, perhaps, a little less refined than in most of his other master works. I started to like this book and it's initial display of events from the first part, wich I still believe what they were quite boring even though they are premises for later habits of Krull. The translation by Denver Lindley is nothing short of superb. Enough said.

3.5 stars. ), the resources below will generally offer Confessions of Felix Krull chapter summaries, quotes, and analysis of themes, characters, and symbols. Krull is a man unhampered by moral precepts that govern the conduct of ordinary mortals, and this natural lack of scruple, coupled with his formidable mental and physical endowments, enables him to develop the arts of subterfuge. Cliff Notes ™, Cliffnotes ™, and Cliff's Notes ™ are trademarks of Wiley Publishing, Inc. SparkNotes ™ and Spark Notes ™ are trademarks of Barnes & Noble, Inc. The sobriquet "confidence man" is a bit misleading, especially when one compares Felix Krull with the protagonist of Melville's "The Confidence Man: His Masquerade," which is also formally incomplete, but in a way that is satisfyingly provocative, since the confidence man of the title is seen in full maturity and efficacity in a richly and fully drawn world. I think that my lost feeling might be attributed to the fact that the writing of Thomas Mann is confounding, and at least in the case of Felix Krull is dumbfounding. His charm and physical attractiveness becomes clear as people of both sexes offer him propositions. The story is told in the first person by Felix directly to the reader as if he were actually sitting with the reader reminiscing about his life. The characters are unforgettable, right down to the smallest and inconsequential characters. The first half of this novel is a dramatic monologue almost as good as Mann’s, The first part of the book, I have to be honest, is boring...I almost gave up on it. And he likes grand hotels better. I don't think it will wind up on anyone's top 10 list, but it's certainly worth a read. Analysis and discussion of characters in Thomas Mann's Confessions of Felix Krull, Confidence Man This was quite and interesting piece of writing which gave me quite a headache regarding how I should grade it, since it is an unfinish novel and it would feel unfair to downgrade it because of the lack of structure.

I don't know exactly what, but it did. Who knew the man who wrote Magic Mountain and Death in Venice might actually have a sense of humor? Among the summaries and analysis available for Confessions of Felix Krull, there Yet because the picaresque approach aims at vice, not at the person who has it, the protagonist or picaro becomes a hero—or, to be more precise, an antihero. There are few authors whose works bring me as much pleasure as Thomas Mann.

Thomas Mann's "Confessions of Felix Krull, Confidence Man" is an extremely witty, funny, and entertaining novel. There is brilliant writing here, but the formal incompleteness and the failure to provide the later years leaves one with a sense of frustration. “—Yo no estoy acostumbrado a tomarme la vida a broma, querido marqués. In the three main characteristics that I use to judge a novel, story/plot, writing, and characters, it exceeds profusely. I particularly liked watching Felix worm his way out of the German draft and trying to pass himself off as an accomplished tennis player. He moves through initiation fully aware that the person who loves the world shapes himself to please it and that, in turn, he who loves himself shapes the world to suit himself. There is fun to be had with the threefold perspective of young Felix, narrating Felix, and implied author Mann, but to be honest, if you haven't had your fill of unreliable narrators at this point of history, I don't know what to say. Apparently a parody of Goethe’s pompous autobio, the antihero of. Well done, but also (for me) hampered by the impossibility of doing anything new with the first part of life-stories. It was as if it were written by a completely different Mann. I think that my lost feeling might be attributed to the fact that the writing of Thomas Mann is confounding, and at least in the case of Felix Krull is dumbfounding.

Krull assures us he only writes for a cultivated audience, people cut from finer wood as he is himself.

The story is as imaginative as one could hope for and it's as funny as any book I have read. Well i get that this is a kind of picaresque novel and that Mann on purpose imitates style of previous centuries (XVIII or even XVII). Mann based the novel on an expanded version of a story he had written in 1911 and he managed to finish, and publish part one of the Confessions of Felix Krull, but due to his death in 1955 the saga of the morally flexible and irresistible conman, Felix, remained unfinished. Offers quick summary / overview and other basic information submitted by Wikipedia contributors who considers themselves "experts" in the topic at hand. KirkusReviews - Confessions of Felix Krull. Confessions of Felix Krull, Confidence Man, the last work by Thomas Mann and the only one that can be categorized as humorous, is a twentieth century version of the classic picaresque novel.