Cronin (p. 194) and Maurois (p. 502) insist that blackmail was indeed afoot. Ewelina Hańska (* 6. She told him of the family's plan to visit Geneva for Christmas; Balzac agreed to visit before the end of the year. The wealth of her late husband's estate would go to Anna, who had become engaged to a Polish Count, Jerzy Mniszech.

Anna Hanska Mniszech Jean Gigoux 1853.jpg 497 × 600; 88 KB. [43] It was clear to all that Hański was in ill health, and Hańska began to think about her future with the French author. Function: _error_handler, File: /home/ah0ejbmyowku/public_html/application/views/user/popup_harry_book.php Mme Hańska fut aussi incarnée par Fanny Ardant dans Balzac réalisé par Josée Dayan pour TF1 en 1999. [24] The surviving daughter, Anna, was a welcome joy to Hańska, and she trusted her care to a young governess named Henriette Borel who had moved to Wierzchownia from the Swiss town of Neuchâtel.

[43] It was clear to all that Hański was in ill health, and Hańska began to think about her future with the French author. [44], After leaving Geneva on 8 February,[10] the Hański family spent several months visiting the major cities of Italy. To soothe the publisher, Hańska falsely claimed that Balzac had chosen Rabou as his literary successor. Born at the Wierzchownia estate in Volhynia[1] (now Ukraine), Hańska married landowner Wacław Hański (Wenceslas Hanski) when she was a teenager. The emotion involved, she wrote, "would be fatal". By July, however, he was confined to his bed. [60], In late July 1843 Balzac visited her in St. Petersburg, the first time they had seen one another in eight years.

They had five children, but only a daughter, Anna, survived. [50] Her religious interest was more towards mysticism than mainstream religions; she corresponded with Baroness Barbara von Krüdener, and read on Rosicrucianism, Martinism and Swedenborgianism. Robb, p. 227; Pierrot, pp. Roland Le Heunen, « Les lettres à madame Hanska : métalangage du roman et représentation romanesque ». In den späten 1820er-Jahren hatte sie begonnen, die Romane Balzacs zu lesen.

Hańska was forced to sell the house, but was allowed to continue living there. 151–152; Cronin, p. 155. In the meantime, she asked Balzac to begin collecting for her autographs of the famous people he spent time with in Paris and elsewhere. [37] They met later that day (September 25)[10] at a spot overlooking Lake Neuchâtel; according to legend, he noticed a woman reading one of his books. [22] After dinner he was usually too fatigued to spend time with his wife, and retired early.

The wealth of her late husband's estate would go to Anna, who had become engaged to a Polish Count, Jerzy Mniszech.

One was an Englishwoman named Sarah who had married the Count Emilio Guidoboni-Visconti. [58], Soon after she arrived in the Russian capital of St. Petersburg, in order to resolve some of the litigation issues surrounding her inheritance,[10] she took Anna to a recital by the Hungarian composer and pianist Franz Liszt.

View the profiles of people named Ewelina Hańska. [10] Czerny concludes by saying: "However one could analyze her and their relationship, the impact of her love on Balzac was persistent, all-enveloping and decisive". [8], She was born in the Pohrebyszcze castle, in the Kiev Governorate of Russian partition of Poland. Balzac moved in with a friend after several months, and Hańska approached the remains of her late husband's writing. [86], Both Hańska and Balzac took ill after the wedding; she suffered from a severe attack of gout, for which her doctor prescribed an unusual treatment: "Every other day she has to thrust her feet into the body of a sucking-pig which has only just been slit open, because it is necessary that the entrails should be quivering. To soothe the publisher, Hańska falsely claimed that Balzac had chosen Rabou as his literary successor. [86], Both Hańska and Balzac took ill after the wedding; she suffered from a severe attack of gout, for which her doctor prescribed an unusual treatment: "Every other day she has to thrust her feet into the body of a sucking-pig which has only just been slit open, because it is necessary that the entrails should be quivering. 168–170; Gerson, pp. Hańska wrote to Balzac several times during 1832. During a trip to Lake Biel, Hański went to arrange lunch, leaving his wife and Balzac alone. Motivated partly by concern, partly by boredom, and partly by a desire to influence the life of a great writer (as her sister Karolina had done), she wrote to Balzac.