This is not the first time Ms. Boyce has experimented with how art and observers interact. The gallery may have invited us to engage in debate about the objectification of women and ideals of beauty, but we’re not doing that. A barometer of public taste. Postcards of the painting were also taken out of the gallery shop. Refuting accusations of censorship, gallery curator Clare Gannaway said "it wasn’t about denying the existence of particular artworks.". Start your Independent Premium subscription today. “Something about power, and what people feel they’re entitled to in relation to art.”. “I’ve been getting requests from all over the world to talk about this, and I’m thinking, ‘Wow, O.K., it’s tapping into something,’” she said. The Pre-Raphaelite painting, “Hylas and the Nymphs,” by the Victorian artist John William Waterhouse, is now back on display at the Manchester Art Gallery.

Want to bookmark your favourite articles and stories to read or reference later? The furore came two months after two sisters started a petition asking the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York to remove, or at least reimagine the way it presented, a painting by Balthus of a neighbour's daughter in an erotic pose. "For me personally, there is a sense of embarrassment that we haven’t dealt with it sooner," she said of the room.

Hylas and the Nymphs, painted by John William Waterhouse in 1896 is an iconic Victorian painting, but its erotic content - combined with the rise of the … The bitter rivals' final TV debate was more restrained this time but there were plenty of personal jabs. Persuading an undecided voter. .css-14iz86j-BoldText{font-weight:bold;}A gallery is to put a Victorian painting of naked adolescent girls back on display after a row over censorship. No rules. As movements like #MeToo and #TimesUp prompt new conversations about harassment and abuse, gender inequality, and the representation of women in art, the removal of “Hylas and the Nymphs” seems to have struck a nerve. The sisters said the Met was "romanticising voyeurism and the objectification of children". “And analyse the painting in context.”. Due to the sheer scale of this comment community, we are not able to give each post the same level of attention, but we have preserved this area in the interests of open debate. © 2020 BBC. “To remove this work art from view is not an interesting critique but a crass gesture that will end up on the wrong side of history,” the art critic Jonathan Jones wrote in The Guardian.

You can also choose to be emailed when someone replies to your comment. (The women were nymphs and Hylas did not make it out alive, according to the Greek myth on which the painting is based. This is the question being posed by Manchester Art Gallery, which has courted controversy by removing John William Waterhouse's Hylas and the Nymphs from its walls. Independent Premium Comments can be posted by members of our membership scheme, Independent Premium. The Pre-Raphaelite painting, “Hylas and the Nymphs,” by the Victorian artist John William Waterhouse, is now back on display at the Manchester Art Gallery. The removal is only temporary, however, and appears to be more an act of trolling on the part of curators, the empty space where the painting hung being designed "to prompt conversations about how we display and interpret artworks in Manchester’s public collection," with visitors sticking Post-it notes around the void offering their reaction. Manchester Art Gallery. Persuading an undecided voter, Lockdown: 'I cycled every street in my 5km radius' VideoLockdown: 'I cycled every street in my 5km radius', The Covid doctor whose dance video went viral. .css-po6dm6-ItalicText{font-style:italic;}Follow us on Facebook, on Twitter @BBCNewsEnts, or on Instagram at bbcnewsents. The painting will return on Saturday. The gallery is now planning a series of public events "to encourage further debate". Professor Liz Prettejohn, who curated a Waterhouse exhibition at the Royal Academy in London in 2009, told BBC News: "Taking it off display is killing any kind of debate that you might be able to have about it in relation to some of the really interesting issues that it might raise about sexuality and gender relationships. VideoInside Europe’s most infected area, Biden or Trump? John William Waterhouse’s 1896 painting Hylas and the Nymphs depicts a scene from Greek Mythology where Nomia, a water nymph, lures Hylas, one of Heracles’ companions, to his watery grave. Visitors were invited to write their views about the decision on sticky notes and post them in the vacant space. If you have a story suggestion email entertainment.news@bbc.co.uk. It is not just about that one painting, it is the whole context of the gallery," Gannaway added. Video, Composer with dementia meets students he inspired, Inside Europe’s most infected area. We want to do something about it now because we have forgotten about it for so long.”. The existing Open Comments threads will continue to exist for those who do not subscribe to Independent Premium.

“Having heard the effects that it’s having on the people who have to work with it all the time, I think we need to have a conversation about it,” she said. VideoComposer with dementia meets students he inspired, 'The most wholesome thing on the internet', Why Nigerian protesters are upset with Beyoncé, Africa's top shots: Sunrise, ballots and bullets, Inside Europe’s most infected area. Museum volunteers had heard visitors make inappropriate comments about Victorian paintings of naked women. Hylas shows us the power and flexibility of Greek and Roman myth: those nymphs can be anything, and they can change from version to version. And it posed questions, including: “The gallery exists in a world full of intertwined issues of gender, race, sexuality and class which affect us all. Persuading an undecided voter, Lockdown: 'I cycled every street in my 5km radius' Video, Lockdown: 'I cycled every street in my 5km radius', The Covid doctor whose dance video went viral. The painting's initial removal was filmed to be made into a new piece of video art for artist Sonia Boyce's exhibition at the gallery in March. “To interrupt that is seen as an act of vandalism somehow, or as something that is challenging those power structures,” she said. But here it would seem it's us who are taking the roles of what we think of as the very moralistic Victorians.". Her planned exhibition at the Manchester Art Gallery, which she referred to as a “mini-retrospective” of work that has often encouraged observer interaction, will open on March 23. Please continue to respect all commenters and create constructive debates. Gallery Wanted to Provoke Debate by Removing Naked Nymphs Painting. Video, Biden or Trump? The most insightful comments on all subjects will be published daily in dedicated articles. Title of the room where the Waterhouse normally hangs has caused the gallery 'embarrassment', Find your bookmarks in your Independent Premium section, under my profile. Manchester Art Gallery said it took down Hylas and the Nymphs by JW Waterhouse to "encourage debate" about how such images should be displayed. The museum refused to remove it, saying it wanted to encourage "the continuing evolution of existing culture through informed discussion and respect for creative expression". Curators and staff members at the museum did not respond to requests for comment this weekend. artist Sonia Boyce's exhibition at the gallery. Commentary poured in via dozens of sticky notes, hundreds of online comments and widespread news coverage. It Succeeded.

John William Waterhouse – Hylas and the Nymphs (1896) This publicity stunt was in fact prompted by an actual controversy over Balthus’s painting Thérèse Dreaming (which does feature an underage girl in a somewhat provocative pose) at the Museum of Modern Art in New York.
wrote Michael Browne, an artist, in a comment online, Her planned exhibition at the Manchester Art Gallery. Gallery denies censorship after removing Victorian nymphs painting, Curator defends removal of 'uncomfortable' nymph painting, Composer with dementia meets students he inspired. “The emergence of P.C. Video, The Covid doctor whose dance video went viral, Presidential debate: Trump and Biden row over Covid, climate and racism, US election 2020: Kristen Welker was 'clear winner' on social media, Coronavirus: North Korea warnings over 'yellow dust coming from China', Covid: US gives full approval for antiviral remdesivir drug, Presidential debate: Key takeaways from the Trump-Biden showdown, Epstein: Ghislaine Maxwell denies witnessing 'inappropriate' activities, Coronavirus: France extends overnight curfew as cases surge, Australia child abuse: Police arrest 44 suspects and rescue 16 children, The apps promising to improve your sex life. ), In a statement, the gallery said the removal was meant “to prompt conversation about how we display and interpret artworks in Manchester’s public collection.” It encouraged visitors to leave sticky notes at the spot where the painting had hung. The seven mythical creatures in the painting are all shown as naked women.

In 1995, she staged an exhibition in which people had to use peepholes to see ethnographic artifacts at the Brighton Museum. This is the question being posed by Manchester Art Gallery, which has courted controversy by removing John William Waterhouse's Hylas and the Nymphs from its walls. censorship, blurred into Law.”, “Good subject for debate — but please put it back!” a sticky note read.

You can find our Community Guidelines in full here. "Removing art due to political concerns is exactly censorship," wrote Gary Brooks on Twitter.

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