The ship eventually had to leave without him. They snatched away the handsome youth Hylas when he was sent by the Argonauts to fetch water from their springs.

Hylas is referred to in Chapter 18 of Charles Kingsley's novel Hypatia, when the Prefect Orontes, rescued by the Goths, is taken for safety into a house largely populated by women, and fancies himself as "A second Hylas". Hylas went to a spring at Askanios in eastern Mysia When Hylas approached it a Mysian Nymph named Dryope who had already spotted and fallen immediately in love with Hylas grabbed him into a kiss with one arm and seized him by the elbow with the other and abducting him. In legend, Hylas is described as an incredibly handsome man, but as an observer we cannot see his face, so his beauty is unseen. He was ravished away by NYMPHS in Mysia on account of his beauty, and was never found again.. One of the ARGONAUTS. In Greek mythology the Mysian Nymphs were Naiad-nymphs of the springs of the river Ascanius in eastern Mysia (a region of Anatolia). [6], Hylas is also mentioned in Thomas Hardy's Far from the Madding Crowd : "He called again: the valleys and farthest hills resounded as when the sailors invoked the lost Hylas on the Mysian shore; but no sheep. It is still unknown why Waterhouse was so driven to paint such a picture. Hylas and the Nymphs is a story within the Greek myth of Jason and the Argonauts in which they set sail for the iconic Golden Fleece. In classical mythology, Hylas (Ancient Greek: Ὕλας) was a youth who served as Heracles' (Roman Hercules) companion and servant. This greatly upset Heracles, so he along with Polyphemus searched for a great length of time. Write the second section of your page here. What is obvious, while observing this evocative imagery, is that the nymph concerned is acting in the the role of a femme fatale. His abduction by water nymphs was a theme of ancient art, and has been an enduring subject for Western art in the classical tradition.

We cannot view him properly, as he is facing away from the observer, with only his back on view. Hylas and the Nymphs is a story within the Greek myth of Jason and the Argonauts in which they set sail for the iconic Golden Fleece. Nymphs can cause metamorphoses. To great Alcides, that when as he dyde Hylas and the Water Nymphs (by Henrietta R. Rae). Good old-fashioned lust.

Due to the watery nature of the painting, Waterhouse could not have recreated the scene in his art studio, but perhaps Waterhouse based the nymphs in his paintings on those of nymph models. The poet Theocritus (about 300 BC) wrote about the love between Heracles and Hylas: "We are not the first mortals to see beauty in what is beautiful. The nymphs in particular, are painted in such a way, that it is obvious that they are about to lure him away from his colleagues.

Heracles took Hylas with him on the Argo, making him one of the Argonauts. His abduction by water nymphs was a theme of ancient art, and has been an enduring subject for Western art in the classical tradition.

He represents the materialist position against which Berkeley (through Philonous) argues. Perhaps Waterhouse painted the picture in such a way, so that we could see the image from Hylas's viewpoint. Manchester Arts Gallery decided to buy the painting shortly after Waterhouse had finished painting it. Hylas and the Nymphs (1896) by John William Waterhouse. Waterhouse was a classical artist, who was influenced from a very young age by other classical painters such as Lord Leighton and Alma-Tadema. As he was trying to get some water from her spring, she pulled him in and he was never seen again. The ship set sail without them. "Hylas" is the name of one of the two characters in George Berkeley's Three Dialogues between Hylas and Philonous. And every wood, and every valley wyde He was stunned and therefore stopped fetching the water in order to kiss one of them. All Rights Reserved. Hylas and the Nymphs is an 1896 oil painting by John William Waterhouse.The painting depicts a moment from the Greek and Roman legend of the tragic youth Hylas, based on accounts by Ovid and other ancient writers, in which the enraptured Hylas is abducted by Naiads (female water nymphs) while seeking drinking water. He wailed womanlike with many a teare, It was well known that to create the perfect composition for his paintings, Waterhouse often utilised the services of models. The island was searched several times over, but he was never found. Hylas was kidnapped by nymphs of the spring of Pegae, Mysia when they fell in love with him, and he vanished without a trace (Apollonios Rhodios). He obviously found something appealing which eventually drew him to paint this masterpiece. Genealogy. In classical mythology, Hylas (Ancient Greek: Ὕλας) was a youth who served as Heracles' (Roman Hercules) companion and servant. His role in the story was to fetch water once they had reached the shore. Today, Hylas and the Nymphs remains Waterhouse's most accomplished and world renowned work of art. Hylas was a close companion of Herakles and even joined the crew of the Argo being one of the original Argonauts. Hylas was young and very good looking, and the nymph fell for him. At some point The Argonauts stopped at Mysia and Hylas was sent to get water.

Many art critics believe that he was drawn to the natural and idyllic environment of the legend, and that both the women and nymphs in the story intrigued him with their magic and great power. He fild with Hylas name; the Nymphes eke "Hylas" cryde. Though Herakles and Polyphemus searched extensively they never found him and Dryope made him her lover (in some versions her husband). Perhaps Waterhouse saw this point as irrelevant, preferring the viewer to be overwhelmed and drawn to the nymphs beauty, just as Hylas too was hypnotised. Hylas was the young man whom Heracles 1 loved. ", This article is about the Greek mythological figure. © www.John-William-Waterhouse.com 2019. [1][2][3] In some accounts, his father was Euphemus[4] or King Ceyx of Trachis.

Theocritus, on the other hand, has the nymphs shutting his mouth underwater to stifle his screams for Heracles. Abduction At some point The Argonauts stopped at Mysia and Hylas was sent to get water. Waterhouse was well known for his use of colour and texture, and in Hylas and the Nymphs, he has managed to paint the nymphs with luminous skin, that both echo and reflect the clear waters of the lake. No, even Amphitryon's bronze-hearted son, who defeated the savage Nemean lion, loved a boy—charming Hylas, whose hair hung down in curls. Hylas and the Nymphs is an incredibly intricate composition, with many figures incorporated into the overall imagery.

Hylas joined, along with his friend Heracles 1, the expedition of the ARGONAUTS that sailed to Colchis, in the eastern coast of what is today known as the Black Sea, in order to fetch the Golden Fleece. For other uses, see, Three Dialogues between Hylas and Philonous, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Hylas&oldid=969458988, Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License, This page was last edited on 25 July 2020, at 15:13.

It is still unknown why Waterhouse was so driven to paint such a picture. https://greekmythology.wikia.org/wiki/Hylas?oldid=72748. Hylas was a close companion of Herakles and even joined the crew of the Argo being one of the original Argonauts. [5], After Heracles killed Theiodamas in battle, he took on Hylas as arms bearer and taught him to be a warrior. And like a father with a dear son he taught him all the things which had made him a mighty man, and famous.". What is unique about this painting is that our eyes are not drawn to the character of Hylas, who is the central character of this Greek myth, but rather to one nymph, the one who entices him into the water. Also, in painting the nymphs in an ethereal light, Hylas is made to appear more human with his dark olive skin tone. Today, Hylas and the Nymphs remains Waterhouse's most accomplished and world renowned work of art. Nymphs are often referred to as goddesses, and some are immortal. The story of Hylas and the nymphs is alluded to in Book 3 of Edmund Spenser's The Faerie Queene, Canto XII, Stanza 7: Or that same daintie lad, which was so deare This is clearly evident when observing the scenery and characterisation in Hylas and the Nymphs. The painting depicts Hylas, who was a warrior, an Argonaut, as well as that of an incredibly handsome man.

Stanisław Lem adopted these characters in his 1957 non-fiction, philosophical book, Dialogi (Dialogues).