After the explosion the pit almost closed down. Early 20th Century photo showing Oaks headgear on left. List donated to National Coal Mining Museum for England in 2005 from Barwick-in-Elmet. In 1845 an explosion killed 3 men at the pit followed on 5th March 1847 by a massive explosion of firedamp (methane) which killed 73 miners. It resulted in 361 deaths during two separate explosions and remains the worst pit disaster ever in … In December 1866 a colliery in Barnsley was ripped apart by a series of explosions over two days, killing at least 361 men and boys, in what remains England's worst mining disaster. Some of the victims were 10 years old! The Barnsley Bed seam of coal was a valuable commodity but also a very volatile seam. The officially reported number of victims was 361 but our research has produced a list of over 380 names.

The officially reported number of victims was 361 but our research has produced a list of 383 names. On 12th December at about 1.20 pm, 1866, the Oaks Colliery exploded. This time the fatalities would eventually  number 361 and the pits name would be burnt into the history books as the colliery where the greatest loss of life occurred in a English Coal Mine. On 12th December at about 1.20 pm, 1866, the Oaks Colliery exploded. The accident was the worst in British mining history until the Senghenydd Colliery Disaster which claimed 439 lives in the South Wales coalfield in 1913. The Oaks Colliery Two Months After The Explosion This is a section of a book written by John Tomlinson (contemporary journalist and author) and gives another insight into the disaster … Alterations and repairs enabled coal production to resume in 1851. However on the 14th October 1913 an explosion ripped through the heart of the Universal Senghenydd Colliery in South Wales killing 436 miners. This time the fatalities would eventually number 361 and the pits name would be burnt into the history books as the colliery where the greatest loss of life occurred in a English Coal Mine. It exploded again the next day. The Oaks disaster remains the worst in an English coalfield. This colour picture was brought up from the NUM London offices in the 1950's. Finalement, l`ordre a abandonné la région.

Part of the upcoming Virtual Reality Experience commemorating 150 year anniversary of the Oaks Colliery Disaster 12th Dec 1866. It was stated under oath and in two Command Reports to Parliament that the explosions killed 361 men and boys, based on 340 working below ground in the first explosion (with six survivors) and 27 rescuers killed on 13 December. History of Oaks Colliery and Barnsley Main Colliery - by kind permission of Eddie Downes author Yorkshire Collieries 1947 - 1994. Location of shafts from grid references as seen from Google Earth Map Data. Of the 436 who died, only 72 bodies were recovered. Underground Plan signed by J Kenyon Blackwell Mines Inspector. A 1 minute preview of the colliery … Oaks Colliery; Photos & Artefacts; General Info; Memorials; From the day of the disaster names of the victims started to emerge. Oaks Disaster List We have worked with a team of dedicated volunteers to research the names of the men and boys killed in the 1866 Oaks Colliery Disaster . The pit was now known as The Oaks Colliery. The 2 shafts are at the bottom of the line and the cupola shaft is at the top. It exploded again the next day. The pit was now known as The Oaks Colliery. Information gathered by the Union and given to the Leeds Mercury the day after the second fatal explosion. The Oaks Colliery Disaster, Barnsley, Yorkshire happened on 12 and 13 December 1866. We have worked with a team of dedicated volunteers to research the names of the men and boys killed in the 1866 Oaks Colliery Disaster.. The explosion killed 12 miners from Ingleton, North Yorkshire read here to find out more. For almost 50 years the worst mining disaster in the UK was at the Oaks Colliery, near Barnsley, where two explosions killed 361 men and boys.