They were completed in 1953, and Carlo Scarpa was commissioned the setup of the art gallery, which was opened on 23 June 1954. They were previously housed in the Pinacoteca della Regia Università and, from 1866, in the Museo Nazionale of Palermo, which became a regional museum when Sicily acquired autonomous status. Called to prepare the rooms of the new Gallery of Sicily in the Abatellis Palace, Scarpa found amongst the powerful ashlars, the ideal archetypes of his material voluptuousness, of his sensitive taste for form and making geometrical; he found the fabulous space of his imaginary figure, reconstructed the charm that these places recall and on the impressum invented his dialettic itinerary. 07835550158R.E.A. In the 18th century, following the construction of a bigger church (the current Santa Maria della Pietà), the chapel was abolished and divided into several rooms. Figure and function Called to prepare the rooms of the new Gallery of Sicily in the Abatellis Palace, Scarpa found amongst the powerful ashlars, the ideal archetypes of his material voluptuousness, of his sensitive taste for form … Therefore, the great architect continued the restoration to adapt it for exhibition purposes. He arranged colored fabric, stucco or wooden backgrounds, superimposed on the walls of the … Credits Architectural crystals Authors: Mario Guiotto, Armando Dillon (I restoration); Carlo Scarpa (II restoration and museographic exhibition); Maria Santa Giunta (III restoration); Guido Meli (extension), Chronology: 1950 | 1953 (I restoration); 1953 | 1954 (II restoration); 2007 | 2009 (III restoration and extension).

Fragments of the City Originally published in Domus 708, September 1989. The “Monastero del Portulano” (so the building was nicknamed) underwent many modifications of the interiors over time and was, finally, heavily damaged in the bombings of April 1943: the bombs hit the porch overlooking the courtyard and destroyed the roof of the central hall.
Palazzo Abatellis (also known as Palazzo Patella) is a palace in Palermo, Sicily, southern Italy, located in the Kalsa quarter. Search In Scarpa’s view, “to obtain something you must invent relationships,” 3 and Palazzo Abatellis is a treasure chest of correspondences, like a piece of poetry. In 1953, Carlo Scarpa went to Palermo, proceeded by the fame that procured him the year before the refined preparation of the Antonello exhibition in Messina. He arranged colored fabric, stucco or wooden backgrounds, superimposed on the walls of the building, which change their tone as the light changes in the room. Architecture found Scarpa, new “Byzantine” master, was inebriated by the effluvia of the aromas and the spices that make the atmosphere heavy and dense with smells, by the sharp racket of the children and the rhythmical sing songs, by the riot of the sun and the colours rendered so intense by the violent light of the Mediterranean. Works were directed by the architects Mario Guiotto and, later, Armando Dillon. The partition of the Abatellis Museum (first work of Scarpa’s museum interventions seeing the preceeding had only been temporary and partial fitting intervention, even if not a minor value of the Gallery of the Accademy), orders the rooms in chronological progression and arranges the works to be exhibited according to the discipline and the two floors – sculpture on the ground floor and painting on the upper floor. After the death of Abatellis, it remained to his wife, and, after her death, it was given to a female monastery. Project Apparently free, they are actually positioned according to calibrated spatial relations that place them in precise sequences. Also present are three panels with St. Augustine, St. Gregory the Great and St. Jerome also by Antonello, once part of a polyptych now destroyed, and Vouet's Saint Agatha's Vision of Saint Peter in Prison. The exhibition design of Palazzo Abatellis in Palermo, 1953-54, Domus 1050 is on newsstands: “Will technology save us?”, Palermo. Scarpa arranged the rooms to give each painting the necessary space to be seen, isolating one from the others. The detail and the surface Palazzo Butera and its art rooms, Manifesta 12 | Palermo: “The Planetary Garden. The palace was then restored, and it was decided to use it for the Galleria d’Arte per le collezioni d’arte medievale ("Gallery of medieval collection"). The ground floor contains 12th century wooden works, 14th and 15th century works including some by Antonello Gagini, painted maiolica from the 14th-17th centuries, the 15th-century Bust of a Gentlewoman by Francesco Laurana and painted panels of wooden ceilings.

Palazzo Abatellis is a building of the late fifteenth century designed by Matteo Carnilivari for Francesco Abatellis, an author of ancient portolans who donated the building, at his death, to a monastic order of seclusion.

A room is dedicated to the work of Antonello da Messina; Scarpa enlarged the room’s reduced dimensions by using wooden partition walls and placing “L’Annunziata” free standing. Italiano, Building houses, making cities It was the residence of Francesco Abatellis (or Patella), port master of the Kingdom of Sicily. The palazzo, an example of Gothic-Catalan architecture, was designed in the 15th century by Matteo Carnelivari, at the time working in Palermo at the palazzo Aiutamicristo.

During the night between 16 and 17 April 1943 the palace was struck during an Allied air bombing: the loggia, the portico, the south-western sector and the wall of the western tower crumbled down. The front part was used as parlatory, while the rear section, with the altar removed, was turned into a series of storage rooms. Map Home
After the war, at the beginning of the fifties, the Sovrintendenza entrusted a first restoration to the architect Mario Guiotto, who rebuilt the parts collapsed during the war.