He's been writing about music for 20 years and has been published at American Songwriter, Bandcamp Daily, Reverb, Spin, Stereogum, uDiscoverMusic, VinylMePlease and some others that he's forgetting right now. The group played it in the suitably glamorous setting of The Palms Casino Hotel at the 2007 MTV Video Music Awards: a performance for which QOTSA were joined by special guests CeeLo Green and Dave Grohl. from Era Vulgaris (2007; Interscope). You want the apocalypse? Leave it to a sneering, chain-smoking lothario to write one of modern rock’s smartest, sexiest love songs.

This month's action-packed edition of our metal column features interviews with Disfear [above], Meshuggah, and Nachtmystium. No qualifiers. This is rock and roll captured in four and a half minutes.

Josh Homme had been toying with Queens’ signature hit, ‘No One Knows’, for five years before it finally fell into place for 2002’s Songs For The Deaf. Kendrick Lamar’s ‘Good Kid, mAAd City’: A Lesson In Storytelling, ‘Snap!’: The Jam Crackle On First Hits Retrospective, ‘Money, Money, Money’: ABBA’s International Smash Hits US Market, ‘Blue Moves’: One Of Our Most Underrated Records, Says Elton John, ‘Night Moves’: Bob Seger And The Silver Bullet Band’s Classic, Shawn Mendes Tapped For ‘Every Vote Counts: A Celebration of Democracy’ Performance, Jessie Reyez Steals The Show And Daddy Yankee Wins Big At 2020 Billboard Latin Music Awards, The Weeknd Drops Horror-Filled Visual For ‘Too Late’, Sam Smith Partners With Spotify For 3D ‘Diamonds’ Visual, Charley Pride To Win CMA’s Willie Nelson Lifetime Achievement Award.

After two decades and five further albums, his singular, desert-dwelling outfit still sound prophetic. But like all Queens albums, it gets better with time.
His machismo flexing has always masked a surprisingly delicate ear for songwriting, and between his soaring falsetto and relentlessly chugging power chords, Homme has done a lot to carry rock forward. Stay up to date on the latest news, reviews, interviews and more.

They are the opposite of a secret at this point- a living rock n’ roll legend of our time. “I was born in the desert, May 17 in ’73,” croons Homme, going on to proffer up his group’s mission statement: “When the needle …

For a band who more often than not seeks to offer their listeners a loud form of escape, “A Song for the Deaf” is impressively intricate and dynamic, perhaps still a form of escapism but one that stimulates on a more sophisticated level. Now I am officially listening to all 6 of these albums (including Like Clockwork) in a row. Tight-knit singles like “Little Sister” and “In My Head” sit beside sprawling behemoths like “Someone’s In The Wolf” and “Everybody Knows That You Are Insane,” while the slithering “Tangled Up in Plaid” may be the most sinister song Homme has ever written, with its ambiguous tale of freedom and self-harm. His machismo flexing has always masked a surprisingly delicate ear for songwriting, and between his soaring falsetto and relentlessly chugging power chords, Homme has done a lot to carry rock forward.
Queens of the Stone Age's Josh Homme goes grumpy old man on us, getting nostalgic for his old bands' material, bemoaning the death of the record shop, and refusing to buy an iPhone. Listening back to this first album now, it’s shocking just how meek Josh Homme’s whinny sounds compared the full-bodied howl of his later records. from Villains (2017; Matador). Open Mike Eagle – Anime Trauma And Divorce, Sturgill Simpson – Cuttin’ Grass Vol.

In a discography full of pummeling riffs and unchecked aggression, it turns out that QOTSA’s most powerful music is the kind that creeps slowly into your head, shaking your body from the inside out. The Deeper Must Listens: You Would Know, You Can’t Quit Me Baby. Fans have long since speculated whether the song’s bitter, sneering lyric (“You want to know why you’re so hollow?/Because you are”) is aimed at QOTSA’s former bassist Nick Oliveri, but whatever the truth of the matter, ‘Everybody Knows That You’re Insane’ is visceral, blistering rock’n’roll. The cream of the crop was surely ‘In The Fade’ – an affecting anti-suicide paean on which Lanegan’s smoky baritone was shadowed by Homme’s ghostly falsetto.