Bacon, saying that he was clapped and whistled out at Rome for Shakespeare alluded to … You must be signed in to continue. Hello, hello, hope you're feeling fine. The 'down the wind' part of the phrase comes from the sport of falconry. There was a musical called "Whistle Down the Wind," and a song. Fifthly, he belyeth our noble learned countryman John Note: if you proceed, you will no longer be following. In the song, "whistle down the wind" appears to mean call above the wind and send your voice out, and the singer will hear it. Hello, hello, hope you're feeling mine. Here are the lyrics, but the meaning in the song seems to be different from the definitions above. Non-lyrical content copyright 1999-2020 SongMeanings, Javascript must be enabled for the correct page display, Now and Forever: The Andrew Lloyd Webber Box Set, I Want To Spend My Lifetime Loving You Lyrics. The plot revolved around the mistaken belief of a group of schoolchildren that a fugitive criminal they had discovered in hiding was in fact Jesus. Thus, to 'whistle someone/thing down the wind' is to cast it off to its own fate. Whistle down the wind Let your voices carry Drown out all the rain Light a patch of darkness Treacherous and scary Howl at the stars Whisper when you're sleepy I'll be there you hold you I'll be there to stop The chills and all the weeping Make it clear and strong So the whole night long Every signal that you send Until the very end I will not abandon you my precious friend So try and stand the tide Then you'll raise a … Replies and comments they make will be collapsed/hidden by default. When hawks are released to hunt they are sent upwind and when turned loose for recreation they are sent downwind. maintaining this marriage. I found these definitions on Google: Current Visitors: 429 (0 members, 429 guests). Hope you're feeling time. Hello, hello, hope you're feeling fine. Whistle down the wind Posted by Smokey Stover on December 04, 2009 at 07:17. A freckle and a famous feature. Whistle down the wind Let your voices carry Drown out all the rain Light a patch of darkness Treacherous and scary Howl at the stars Whisper when you're sleeping I'll be there to hold you I'll be there to stop the chills and all the weeping Make it clear and strong So the … Log in now to tell us what you think this song means. Thus, to 'whistle someone/thing down the wind' is to cast it off to its own fate. Out the window. The first appearance of the phrase as we now know it that I can find in print comes from Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, 1826: Surely someone who can whistle down the wind this painful weakness of his nature ... is an anomaly, not a man. It is based on the 1961 film Whistle Down the Wind, whose source novel of the same name was written by Mary Hayley Bell in 1959. The 'down the wind' part of the phrase comes from the sport of falconry. Bring me back my rose I gave away. http://younghegelian.blogspot.com/2004_09_01_younghegelian_archive.html. In a picture. The phrase is in fact much older and derives from the earlier 'whistle away', which meant 'dismiss or cast off'. The phrase 'whistle down the wind' is best known as the title of the 1961 film, directed by Bryan Forbes, and most people probably assume that it originated with the film.